Call for Papers: Special Issues

Please click on the following Special Issue topics for more information.

Editor: Laura D. Kubzansky, Harvard University; Eric S. Kim, University of British Columbia; Judith T. Moskowitz, Northwestern University

Theme of the Special Issue: Individuals as well as healthcare systems, employers, school districts, and governments are increasingly interested in initiatives that can improve the psychological well-being of the people they serve, and the people within their organizations. However, many knowledge gaps undermine our research community’s ability to meet these growing requests for tools that can improve psychological well-being in meaningful, durable, and scalable ways.

The goal of this special issue is to showcase novel empirical evidence examining interventions that can modify psychological well-being, particularly those that have the potential to be scaled at the population level. We are interested in key aspects of how these interventions play out, but particularly welcome papers that speak to the theme of “What Works, What Doesn’t Work, and an Agenda for Future Research.” Around this theme we invite papers that address: meaningful effect sizes, durability and scalability of interventions, efficacy across diverse populations and settings, effective modes of delivery, mechanisms of effect, methodological innovations, brief-touch/micro interventions, and informative null effects. We are also interested in work that seeks to refine or develop conceptual models that specifically include or address why or how interventions are likely to be broadly effective. We define psychological well-being as overall positive state of one’s emotions, life satisfaction, sense of meaning and purpose, and ability to pursue self-defined goals (which others have referred to as emotional well-being: https://www.nccih.nih.gov/grants/concepts/consider/emotional-wellbeing-high-priority-research-networks). We welcome contributions from multiple disciplines including – but not limited to – psychology (health, social, personality, biological, developmental, clinical, cultural, organizational & industrial, cognitive, etc.), public health (social & behavioral sciences, epidemiology, health policy, global health), neuroscience, communication science, economics, sociology, and computer science. At Affective Science, affective processes are broadly construed, and include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations.

We are especially seeking Research Articles, although in exemplary cases, the other types of Articles described below will be considered.

  • Specifications for full length empirical articles: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 150-250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for theoretical/conceptual/opinion articles: limit to 4,000 words (including all main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 150-250 words. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for the brief report: limit to 750 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 150-250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. Maximum of two figures or tables and 20 references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals are due October 1, 2021. Authors who are invited to submit a full article will be notified by November 1, 2021. Full manuscripts will be due by March 1, 2022, with the plan to finalize the special issue by December 1, 2022.

Proposals should be a maximum of two-pages double spaced. For research articles, a description of the question, participants, design, methods, and results are required. Data collection must be completed and data must be fully analysed at the time of submission. For theoretical articles, include a synopsis of the major themes of the paper. Proposals can be submitted to emowbforaffectivescience@gmail.com.

Any questions can be directed to Laura Kubzansky, Eric Kim, or Judy Moskowitz at emowbforaffectivescience@gmail.com.

Editors:     Karen L. Bales, Departments of Psychology and Neurobiology, Physiology, and Behavior, University of California, Davis; Forrest D. Rogers, Princeton Neuroscience Institute and Department of Molecular Biology, Princeton University

Theme of the Special Issue: Affective processes, as construed by Affective Science, include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations. Many of these constructs are studied in non-human animals, and animal studies contribute critically to our understanding of evolutionary origins and proximate mechanisms of affective processes. However, perhaps due to disciplinary boundaries and a fear of anthropomorphism, few animal researchers view themselves as affective scientists. In this special issue, we seek highlight comparative and translational perspectives by promoting and encouraging research, theory, and commentary on affective processes in non-human animals. The scope of this special issue includes studies of translational and evolutionary relevance; studies of neurobiological and physiological mechanism; and novel behavioral perspectives. We encourage papers from disciplines such as behavioral neuroscience, behavioral ecology, primatology, and animal behavior, and we ask that authors make clear connections with the broader field of affective science for the readership. We also encourage papers across animal taxa, not limiting to mammals.

This issue will be focused primarily on empirical research. However, we are also accepting proposals for theoretical/opinion articles and meta-analysis/literature review articles:

  • Specifications for full length empirical articles: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for theoretical/opinion articles: limit to 4,000 words (including all main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for meta-analysis/literature review articles: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits for meta-analyses. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals should be a maximum of one-page double spaced. For research articles, a description of the question, participants, design, methods, and results are required. Data collection must be completed and data must be fully analysed at the time of submission. Proposals can be submitted to klbales@ucdavis.edu. Any questions can be directed to Karen Bales (klbales@ucdavis.edu) or Forrest Rogers (fr1510@princeton.edu).

Editor: Aric A. Prather, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, University of California, San Francisco

Theme of the Special Issue:
Sleep is intimately intertwined with affective experience. Disturbed sleep has been linked to increases in next day negative affect, while increases in negative and positive affect can modulate the quality of one’s nightly sleep. However, because both affect and sleep are multi-dimensional constructs that are often measured at varying levels of analysis (e.g., self-report vs. physiology vs. brain activity, within individual vs. within couple), in constrained and unconstrained conditions, and at differing time scales, inconsistencies in the literature abound. There is a keen need for affective and sleep scientists to clarify the how, when, and for whom sleep and affect are connected and the implications of these dynamic associations.

The goals of this special issue are to showcase novel empirical evidence examining the interactions and recursive links between sleep and affect across interdisciplinary areas. We welcome contributions from multiple disciplines and interdisciplinary collaborations including – but not limited to – psychology (social, health, biological, developmental, clinical, cultural, organizational & industrial, cognitive, etc.), neuroscience, economics, sociology, evolutionary or medical anthropology, and computer science. At Affective Science, affective processes are broadly construed, and include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations. We are especially seeking Research Articles, although in exemplary cases, Theoretical Articles will be considered.

  • Specifications for the research article: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. They are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for the brief report: limit to 750 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. Maximum of two figures or tables and 20 references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals should be one-page double spaced. For research articles, a description of the question, participants, design, methods, and results are required. Data collection must be completed and data must be fully analysed at the time of submission. Proposals can be submitted through sleepAFFS@gmail.com

Any questions can be directed to Aric A. Prather (aric.prather@ucsf.edu)

Editor:Lasana Harris, Department of Experimental Psychology, University College London

Theme of the Special Issue:
The recent wave of social unrest in response to the killing of George Floyd, Rayshard Brooks, and others has thrust structural racism into the spotlight. During this moment, we can all reflect on the fact that discriminatory behavior still exists towards people of African, Latinx, and Asian descent in many countries. In light of these facts, we have focused this special issue on structural racism and affective science.

We invite theoretical and opinion papers, literature reviews/meta-analysis, and empirical papers that (1) reimagine how the scientific process might work in affective science to reduce structural racism and (2) examine the associations between structural racism and affective processes.

In terms of reducing structural racism in affective science, we are interested in changes that could be made to any part of our scientific processes, from student recruitment and retention, and career mentorship to participant selection, research questioning and hypothesis testing, paradigm selection, operationalisation, statistical analysis, peer reviewing, and publication. In terms of examining the associations between structural racism and affective processes, we are interested in papers that examine both directions of influence. Thus, for example, we welcome research on the affective states that foster structural racism, the role that affect plays in reducing racism, and affective consequences for those who encounter structural racism chronically in their lives.

We welcome contributions from multiple disciplines and interdisciplinary collaborations including – but not limited to – psychology (social, political, developmental, cultural, cognitive, psycholinguistics, etc.), political science, philosophy, economics, sociology, evolutionary anthropology, communication science, computer science, and neuroscience. At Affective Science, affective processes are broadly construed, and include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations.

  • Specifications for theoretical/opinion articles: limit to 4,000 words (including all main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 150 words. They are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for meta-analysis/literature review articles: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits for meta-analyses. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for full length empirical articles: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for brief reports: limit to 750 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. Maximum of two figures or tables and 20 references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals should be one-page double spaced. For research articles, a description of the question, participants, design, methods, and results are required. Data collection must be completed and data must be fully analysed at the time of submission. For theoretical articles, include a synopsis of the major themes of the paper. For literature reviews / meta-analyses, a full description of the methods for searching the literature should be explained, as well as inclusion and exclusion criteria. Proposals can be submitted through structuralracism.AFFS@gmail.com

Any questions can be directed to Lasana Harris (lasana.harris@ucl.ac.uk).

Editors: Eran Halperin, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel, and Ruthie Pliskin, Leiden University, The Netherlands

Theme of the Special Issue:
Emotions and other relevant affective processes play a key role in almost every aspect of our social and political lives. In recent decades, scholars from various disciplines have studied the ways in which emotions shape and direct our political decisions and behavior, as well as the ways in which social and political events influence our daily emotional experiences. This research has focused on how affective processes relate to a broad range of political processes and behaviors, including voting, political participation and collective action, intergroup conflict and its resolution, ideology and political polarization, radicalization and political intolerance, social media, and more. These social and political emotional processes can be studied at the individual as well as the collective level, and insights from both approaches can both illuminate fundamental socio-political processes and inform interventions designed to alter and improved them (through different forms of emotion regulation).

The goals of this special issue are to showcase novel theoretical ideas and empirical evidence on the interactions between emotional processes on the one hand and social-political processes on the other hand across a range of (inter)disciplinary areas. We invite submissions from multiple disciplines, including – but not limited to – psychology (social, political, developmental, cultural, cognitive, psycholinguistics, etc.), political science, sociology, communication science, computer science, and neuroscience. At Affective Science, affective processes are broadly construed, and include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations. This call is directed at empirical articles, but theoretical articles may be considered in exceptional cases.

  • Specifications for the research article: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for the brief report: limit to 750 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. Maximum of two figures or tables and 20 references.
  • Specifications for the theoretical article: limit to 4,000 words (including all main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. They are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals should be one-page double spaced. For research articles a description of the question, participants, design, methods, and results are required. Data collection must be completed, and data must be fully analysed at the time of submission. For theoretical articles, include a synopsis of the major themes of the paper. Proposals can be submitted through emotions.in.politics.aff.s@gmail.com.

Any questions can be directed to Eran Halperin (eran.halperin@mail.huji.ac.il) or Ruthie Pliskin (r.pliskin@fsw.leidenuniv.nl).

Editor: Kristen A. Lindquist, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Theme of the Special Issue: The interplay of language and emotion has interested scholars throughout the ages. Recent research in affective science reveals the complex and fascinating ways in which language and emotion interact. For instance, natural human language can be mined to reveal affective meanings that predict outcomes ranging from health and well-being to political behavior. Cross-linguistic differences in semantic structure exist, pointing to cultural differences in emotion understanding, and perhaps even experience. During early development, the use of emotion words by caregivers predicts children’s later emotion understanding and regulatory abilities. In adults, accessing emotion words alters self-reported experiences, physiology, and brain activity. Labeling affective states with emotion words contributes to greater self-regulation in the face of negative emotion and phobias. The goals of this special issue are to showcase novel empirical evidence examining the interaction between language and emotion across a range of interdisciplinary areas. We invite submissions from multiple disciplines including but not limited to psychology (social, clinical, developmental, cultural, cognitive, psycholinguistics, etc.), computer science, engineering, linguistics, sociology, anthropology, and neuroscience. At Affective Science, affective processes are broadly construed, and include emotion, mood, stress, motivation, reward processes, and affective evaluations. We are especially seeking Research Articles, although in exemplary cases, Theoretical Articles will be considered.

  • Specifications for the research article: limit to 2,000 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. There are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Specifications for the brief report: limit to 750 words (including all introductory and discussion material in the main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. Method and Results have no word limits. Maximum of two figures or tables and 20 references.
  • Specifications for the theoretical article: limit to 4,000 words (including all main text, any footnotes, and acknowledgements). Abstract to be no longer than 250 words. They are no limits on figures, tables, or references.
  • Supplemental materials/results may be submitted with the article and will be part of the review process. We will not publish supplemental material that is un-reviewed (SOM-U).

Proposals should be one-page double spaced. For research articles a description of the question, participants, design, methods and results are required. Data collection must be completed and data must be fully analysed. For theoretical articles, include a synopsis of the major themes of the paper. Proposals can be submitted through languageemotionAFFS@gmail.com Any questions can be directed to Kristen Lindquist (Kristen.lindquist@unc.edu).

Special Issue published June 2021. See the Springer website for the list of publications: Affective Science | Volume 2, issue 2 (springer.com)